Hexed (The Iron Druid Chronicles #2) – Kevin Hearne

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Summary:

Atticus O’Sullivan, last of the Druids, doesn’t care much for witches. Still, he’s about to make nice with the local coven by signing a mutually beneficial nonaggression treaty—when suddenly the witch population in modern-day Tempe, Arizona, quadruples overnight. And the new girls are not just bad, they’re badasses with a dark history on the German side of World War II.

With a fallen angel feasting on local high school students, a horde of Bacchants blowing in from Vegas with their special brand of deadly decadence, and a dangerously sexy Celtic goddess of fire vying for his attention, Atticus is having trouble scheduling the witch hunt. But aided by his magical sword, his neighbor’s rocket-propelled grenade launcher, and his vampire attorney, Atticus is ready to sweep the town and show the witchy women they picked the wrong Druid to hex.

Review:

In some ways, Hexed feels like it ought to be a continuation of Hounded, like it is finishing the set-up work that the first book started. Why? It now feels like the players of this world are fully in place: we know that the Morrighan and Brighid will likely spar over the course of the series. We now know which witches will be at his side, and which witches he’ll be sparring with sporadically over the course of the series, and so on.

Why? The first third of the book feels like filler.

We get some fun character interactions, and Hearne is setting up some characters that will become important later in the series, but it’s so insignificant to the plot that none of this story is mentioned in the synopsis at all. Worse still, you could take this all out and have the story basically work as is with very few, very marginal changes. Not helping matters is that this book barely clocks 200 pages without it, it basically NEEDS to be in here to justify calling it a novel. To me, that is the very definition of filler.

But once I got past that, I enjoyed the book. I like the world that Hearne is creating and Atticus is a very likable figure. The world is unique enough and the humor of the first book is still there and if you’re looking for a more action-centric series, this will certainly fit the bill.

I think at this point I expected to be more sold on the series than I am. Will I pick up Hammered at some point? Probably. Do I feel in any rush to do so? Not really.

That said, I completely get why this series is as popular as it is though, and I do think that if you liked the first book you should give this second one a chance.

Verdict: Borrow It

Available: Now

This Savage Song (Monsters of Verity #1) – Victoria Schwab

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Summary:

There’s no such thing as safe in a city at war, a city overrun with monsters. In this dark urban fantasy from acclaimed author Victoria Schwab, a young woman and a young man must choose whether to become heroes or villains—and friends or enemies—with the future of their home at stake. The first of two books, This Savage Song is a must-have for fans of Holly Black, Maggie Stiefvater, and Laini Taylor.

Kate Harker and August Flynn are the heirs to a divided city—a city where the violence has begun to breed actual monsters. All Kate wants is to be as ruthless as her father, who lets the monsters roam free and makes the humans pay for his protection. All August wants is to be human, as good-hearted as his own father, to play a bigger role in protecting the innocent—but he’s one of the monsters. One who can steal a soul with a simple strain of music. When the chance arises to keep an eye on Kate, who’s just been kicked out of her sixth boarding school and returned home, August jumps at it. But Kate discovers August’s secret, and after a failed assassination attempt the pair must flee for their lives. In This Savage Song, Victoria Schwab creates a gritty, seething metropolis, one worthy of being compared to Gotham and to the four versions of London in her critically acclaimed fantasy for adults, A Darker Shade of Magic. Her heroes will face monsters intent on destroying them from every side—including the monsters within.

Review:

I remember requesting a DRC on a whim, not actually expecting to get approval. I got approval the same day as The Crown’s Game. And while I was excited for both, and more or less read the former the day I got the green light, I just sat on this for a while until I picked it up again today. Skipping over what I thought was a problematic prologue and going for the first chapter resulted me getting absolutely hooked. I read 65% of it on my flight home and finished the rest in the same evening because I will be honest: this book is compulsively readable. It’s a great book for when you’re looking for something truly fun to sink your teeth into.

If it I enjoyed it so much why was the prologue a problem for me?

It all comes down to Kate. Kate is the human who would be a monster to impress her father. Her father rules his half of the city mostly by fear, and she wants to be wanted by him, to be allowed to go home again and the lengths of what she’s willing to do to get there turn her pretty dark, pretty quick. It’s sympathetic in that sense of you can tell it’s a girl who just wants her only remaining parent to love her, but it’s also cold enough and hard enough that it takes a long time to reach that sympathetic point. I’m not entirely convinced that that was the POV to start out with.

Luckily, the book has an intriguing premise set in an interesting world that blissfully isn’t telling another story of teenagers improbably banding together to overthrow the tyrant/save the day or what have you. Although the book does walk some familiar paths, the story doesn’t go exactly where you expect it to, and that’s also a refreshing bonus.

If anything, my only real complaint is I would have loved to see what Schwab could have done this under her V.E. Schwab pen-name. This book is pretty dark for YA, but the premise could have gone darker still without much trouble and I would have loved really exploring it. Scwhab never really fully explores the morality at play here and she proved in Vicious especially that it’s something that she’s fantastic at.

All told, this is a return to form for me (I’m not a fan of A Darker Shade of Magic) as it shows all the hallmark originality and questionable morality that makes her stand out as an author. If you haven’t preordered this yet,  why don’t you get on that, mmkay?

Verdict: Buy It

Available: July 5

Kitty and the Midnight Hour (Kitty Norville #1) – Carrie Vaughn

If there’s one way to get me to buy a book that I otherwise hadn’t gotten around to buying it’s this: have the author be signing at an event that I’m already at. This series has been on my radar for a while, and when I realized that Carrie was going to be at Wonder Con the day I was there, I finally bit the bullet and dove in, so let’s take a look.

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Summary:

Kitty Norville is a midnight-shift DJ for a Denver radio station – and a werewolf in the closet. Her new late-night advice show for the supernaturally disadvantaged is a raging success, but it’s Kitty who can use some help. With one sexy werewolf-hunter and a few homicidal undead on her tail, Kitty may have bitten off more than she can chew?

Review:

Kitty and the Midnight Hour is one of those books that’s fairly satisfying to read as you go along, but when I started to think about it, it just left me feeling vaguely dissatisfied. Let’s break it down:

First off, the conceit that Kitty is a “raging success” feels incredibly paper thin. Here she is, on NPR, in Denver, with a show that airs at midnight in a world where vampires and werewolves aren’t out of the closet and she’s playing human. Why would this show attract anyone other than the local geeks? It’s inferred that all these people open to her because she’s easy to talk to, but being easy to talk to and suddenly talking about the problems you have as a vampire are two very different scenarios. And then even on top of that, it’s like within what a month or two she’s suddenly in syndication? Things just don’t work that fast! To be fair, this is where suspension of disbelief comes in, and it’s easy enough to do. I just hate it when books need hand waving to set up the world, and I feel like this is what that is.

Along those lines, this world and the people that live in it just feel underdeveloped. No one outside of the obvious bad guys has any real personality to speak of. I can’t tell you anything remarkable about the werewolf hunter other than he hunts vampires. Rick the vampire likes to slink in and out of the shadows. T.J. is a wolf that is supposedly her friend, but doesn’t seem to do anything other than chastise her for not falling in line with the demands of her Alpha. The vampire characters just feel generic vampire cutouts complete with the token “vampire still dressed in the wrong century” cliche. Kitty herself doesn’t even that rounded or developed. She’s mostly likable, but there’s literally nothing in this book that isn’t directly tied to the main plot so we have no time to flesh her out or have her grow.

Well, I take it back. There is some growth, but it’s not really her. It’s her Wolf. And yes, it’s referred to as Wolf in the book. Remember how Anastasia in Fifty Shades of Gray constantly referred to her Inner Goddess? It’s kind of like that. Not only does she call her Wolf, but sections in which she shifts are done by having her talk about herself in the third person. The unfortunate thing about this is that all the growth in the book seems to be done by her wolf. It’s the wolf that goes from submissive to angry and showing signs of eventually being Alpha. Even more unfortunately, not only does it feel like it robs Kitty of that growth, it makes it feel like it’s another entity entirely that Kitty has no agency over.

Case and point: the current Alpha of her pack is a real sleeze ball who sleeps with whatever females in the pack that he wants to, more or less because he can. Throughout the book the wolf basically rolls over and opens her legs and feels happy because…submissive? It’s like the book forgets that they aren’t wolves, they’re werewolves, which means there is a human aspect and there should be free will and agency. Not only does this rob Kitty of growth, but it just adds this creepy layer to her having sex with Carl that makes it feel dangerously close to rape.

All told, this book just didn’t work for me. The genre has been around long enough now that there are just better options out there whether you prefer something character driven, rich worlds, or more intriguing plots. Unlike some of the other series I’m giving a chance, right now I can safely say I won’t be picking up Kitty Goes to Washington.

Verdict: Skip It

Available: Now

Succubus Blues (Georgina Kincaid #1)

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Summary:

When it comes to jobs in hell, being a succubus seems pretty glamorous. A girl can be anything she wants, the wardrobe is killer, and mortal men will do anything just for a touch. Granted, they often pay with their souls, but why get technical?

But Seattle succubus Georgina Kincaid’s life is far less exotic. At least there’s her day job at a local bookstore–free books; all the white chocolate mochas she can drink; and easy access to bestselling, sexy writer, Seth Mortensen, aka He Whom She Would Give Anything to Touch but Can’t.

But dreaming about Seth will have to wait. Something wicked is at work in Seattle’s demon underground. And for once, all of her hot charms and drop-dead one-liners won’t help because Georgina’s about to discover there are some creatures out there that both heaven and hell want to deny.

After Vampire Academy left me cold (sorry, Rose/Dimitri still kinda wigs me out) and after the major problems I had with Age of  X (and especially The Immortal Crown), I was a bit weary of picking this one up. Luckily, and perhaps because it is one of her older series, I didn’t have any of the issues I had with the other books.

Georgina is a very likable. She’s just the right amount of jaded that it doesn’t feel like it’s trendy or edgy, just naturally world-weary and the backstory of how she became a succubus has just the right note of tragedy. Her reasons for not dating seem genuine, and I think most bookworms can easily relate to the way that she’s in absolute love with Seth Mortensen’s books. I also like that she’s got no connection to police work, detective work or bartending which is always a bonus (okay, I’ll admit book store form of retail is almost a trope in of itself, but it doesn’t bother me as much here).

Really, all told this is quite a fun, basic, urban fantasy novel. My only real gripe is I picked out the bad guy from the moment they met. I was questioning whether you were supposed to, but considering a review for the last book in the series mentioned clue-by-fours, I’m going to go ahead and say that yes, yes you were. Thankfully, it didn’t ruin the fun by having it spoiled, and yet I don’t know that it was strictly necessary either.

As an aside: though there are one or two sex scenes, this book is pretty bloodless as far as violence goes. If you want a cleaner series, this is a good place to look.

All told, I’m not upset I broke my no additional UF series rule. I’ll give the next one a look and see where it goes from there.

Plus, as of 3/23, the book is on sale for $1.99 for Kindle. Hard to beat it at that price!

Verdict: Buy it  if still on sale or if you’re a big UF fan. Otherwise, borrow it. It may be a bit too traditional for some to hold your interest.

Available: Now.

 

Buy It: The Dark Days Club (Lady Helen #1) – Alison Goodman

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Summary:

London, April 1812. On the eve of eighteen-year-old Lady Helen Wrexhall’s presentation to the queen, one of her family’s housemaids disappears-and Helen is drawn into the shadows of Regency London. There, she meets Lord Carlston, one of the few who can stop the perpetrators: a cabal of demons infiltrating every level of society. Dare she ask for his help, when his reputation is almost as black as his lingering eyes? And will her intelligence and headstrong curiosity wind up leading them into a death trap?

Review:

The Dark Days Club immediately got off to a good start by me for one very simple reason: Lady Helen liked being in Society. This is the first time in ages that I’ve picked up a YA historical fantasy and not have a girl bemoan her good luck at being born into the upper classes of Regency England. Rarely this desire is genuinely plot driven, but generally it seems to be more symptomatic of a modern writer imposing our modern views on a decidedly not modern time. Aside from the fact that marriage realistically was it for women back then, the truth was a lot of women look forward to getting married because the apron strings loosened and pressures eased. Once you were married, you had freedoms that you never had before (freedoms that even spinsters didn’t really get) and so it wasn’t so much a thing to look down on as a think to look forward to (albeit with trepidation in the event that you don’t like your intended, but that’s another story). But yeah, long story short: a heroine who likes who she is and where she is so much that down the road she considers giving up her family’s legacy to go back to it is genuinely refreshing. So well done there.

But I wouldn’t recommend it just for that, however. I like the character of Helen. She’s bright and curious, but not overly done (again, women of this time period weren’t all that well educated), she’s likable, not overly headstrong and she weighs the pros and cons before she makes a decision.

In short: she’s a character that feels strong but still of the time period and I really like that.

I also really liked the pacing of this book. Information was doled out at a great pace. Not so fast as to feel rushed or like an information dump and not so slow that you’re all but flipping pages waiting for something to happen. The story itself is interesting, I like that the legacy she wields has some rather nasty consequences and there’s even a nice bit of budding romance that I find rather believable.

All told, if you like YA fantasy, give this a look. You should enjoy yourself.

Verdict: Buy It

Available: Now

Hounded (Iron Druid #1) – Kevin Hearne

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Summary:

Atticus O’Sullivan, last of the Druids, lives peacefully in Arizona, running an occult bookshop and shape-shifting in his spare time to hunt with his Irish wolfhound. His neighbors and customers think that this handsome, tattooed Irish dude is about twenty-one years old—when in actuality, he’s twenty-one centuries old. Not to mention: He draws his power from the earth, possesses a sharp wit, and wields an even sharper magical sword known as Fragarach, the Answerer.

Unfortunately, a very angry Celtic god wants that sword, and he’s hounded Atticus for centuries. Now the determined deity has tracked him down, and Atticus will need all his power—plus the help of a seductive goddess of death, his vampire and werewolf team of attorneys, a bartender possessed by a Hindu witch, and some good old-fashioned luck of the Irish—to kick some Celtic arse and deliver himself from evil.

Review:

So both Seven Black Diamonds and Black City Saint had the fae. Both Black City Saint and Hounded have an Oberon. I gotta say, all this over-lap is more than a little trippy. But you know, it’s okay.

Hounded is awesome.

On my list of Urban Fantasy series to try this year (The Elemental Assassin is also on this list), I was not disappointed. While the short I read last year left me on the fence, this book obliterated any doubts I had about this series. The premise is just a blast: a 2100 year-old Druid that all the Irish gods (and a few non-Irish ones to boot) like to talk to and use in various ways (fighting, sexy times, you name it) whether or not he’s quite aware of the broader plot at hand.

The writing here is nice and light and frothy. No matter how bloody the fighting gets (and it does get bloody), the story never takes it self too seriously. It’s not so joking as to undermine the gravity of the story, but it’s very much that vibe of using humor to take the edge off, to stop it from being too dark. The aforementioned Oberon (his wolfhound) really helps in that respect as does the fact that his attorneys are literally vampires and werewolves.

The other thing that helps is that everyone is full of personality. The humans (gotta love the Widow MacDonagh, whom I’d love to have a drink with sometime), the goddesses, the witches. No one here is left to be a cut-out, except for maybe the cops that are touching the story at a glance.

Even though this is very much episodic Urban Fantasy it just feels fresh and fun – exactly what I was seeking and it may be just what you need as a palette cleanser as well.

The eighth book was just released this year. I look forward to making a dent in this series.

Verdict: Buy It

Available: Now

Autumn Bones (Agent of Hel #2) – Jacqueline Carey

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Summary:

New York Times bestselling author Jacqueline Carey returns to the curious Midwest tourist community where normal and paranormal worlds co-exist—however tenuously—under the watchful eye of a female hellspawn……

Fathered by an incubus, raised by a mortal mother, and liaison to the Pemkowet Police Department, Daisy Johanssen pulled the community together after a summer tragedy befell the resort town she calls home. Things are back to normal—as normal as it gets for a town famous for its supernatural tourism, and presided over by the reclusive Norse goddess Hel.

Not only has Daisy now gained respect as Hel’s enforcer, she’s dating Sinclair Palmer, a nice, seemingly normal human guy. Not too shabby for the daughter of a demon. Unfortunately, Sinclair has a secret. And it’s a big one.

He’s descended from Obeah sorcerers and they want him back. If he doesn’t return to Jamaica to take up his rightful role in the family, they’ll unleash spirit magic that could have dire consequences for the town. It’s Daisy’s job to stop it, and she’s going to need a lot of help. But time is running out, the dead are growing restless, and one mistake could cost Daisy everything……

Review:

I’ll let you in on a secret: writing a year-end Best of list is harder than it seems. Oh sure, there are a few books that you know will be on the list without a doubt, but for every one of those, there are one or two where you think that maybe will be on there, but then with hindsight you realize that while that book was good it wasn’t as great as you thought which makes rounding out that list tough. And that’s where I’m at now: trying to round out my list as we rapidly approach the end of the year. I bring this up because for a while I was debating putting Dark Currents on the list. I liked the world building and the characters and was excited to read this. That excitement held through the first half of the book and then eventually petered out. Is that previous book still worthy of placement if the series falls off almost immediately?

My problem with this book comes from its bi-plot nature: the first book which focuses on Daisy’s relationship with Sinclair and general duties as Hel’s Enforcer. Come midpoint, we finally meet Sinclair’s mother, she unleashes said spirit magic and things devolve into somewhat generic novel about the dead causing issues. Meanwhile, we literally never see his mother again, meaning that her very existence was to set up the second half of the book, and that’s it. That’s the very definition of cheap writing. Why go to the bother of introducing the characters and setting them up as the bad guys to summarily dismiss them? Why couldn’t Carey have found another towns person to unleash the magic? The book covers the period of Halloween, it would have been easy enough to have dumb kids disturb the dead and it would have felt a lot less forced.

I feel like I’m seeing a real and notable trend in Carey’s books: she creates amazing worlds and sticks some fantastic people in them…and then can’t really figure out where to go from there. The first three Kushiel books all had variations of Phedre being held captive and being used by her captors to varying degrees. The second three Kushiel books used magic to varying degrees of success and here the book really does derail when we lose the characters to focus on the plot. In this case the plot isn’t terrible, it’s just generic. We’ve been there before and it’s just not that interesting and not really what I want to be reading.

That being said, there are some things that I liked: I did like how the relationship between Daisy and Sinclair was handled. It was surprisingly mature and realistic in a genre that tends to go for rom com tropes or endless romantic angst in the ‘will-they-or-won’t-they’ sense. I like how Cody the werewolf is written in such a matter that you know that he is 100% serious when he says he’s going to marry another wolf, and that he’s not just going to toss that aside because Daisy is the heroine. The side characters here for the most part are quite likable, from Stefan and Cooper the Outcasts to the Fabulous Casimir the head of the local coven and dealer of magical knick-knacks. It’s not all perfect . One character gets turned into a vampire (willingly) and the character does a complete 180. I get the motivation behind the heel-toe but it also doesn’t seem believable. At least, not as fast as it occurs.

As much as I complained about series like The Others being a bit too much character driven, I kind of wish that had been the focus here because that’s honestly where she shines. When she gets away from it, you realize how mundane Pemkowet really is, and that’s a shame.

Finally, I did go ahead and read some spoiler-filled reviews of the final book of the trilogy and I’ll just say that it was wince-inducing and the kind of thing that makes me absolutely NOT want to read it. I ignored that feeling during the second Kushiel series and regretted it, I won’t make that same mistake again. I will also mention that the last book keeps up this sense of it being two books in one, as many reviewers stated that the first and second half of the book don’t feel related, but more like novellas mushed together. That’s not a good sign. As comparatively short as the books are, she should be able to manage a single plot all the way through.

Verdict:  A weak Borrow It – if you like the world, there’s still something here for you, but maybe not as much as you might like.

Available: now

Dark Currents (Agent of Hel #1) – Jacqueline Carey

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Summary:

Jacqueline Carey, New York Times bestselling author of the acclaimed Kushiel’s Legacy novels, presents an all-new world featuring a woman caught between the normal and paranormal worlds, while enforcing order in both. Introducing Daisy Johanssen, reluctant hell-spawn…

The Midwestern resort town of Pemkowet boasts a diverse population: eccentric locals, wealthy summer people, and tourists by the busload; not to mention fairies, sprites, vampires, naiads, ogres and a whole host of eldritch folk, presided over by Hel, a reclusive Norse goddess.

To Daisy Johanssen, fathered by an incubus and raised by a single mother, it’s home. And as Hel’s enforcer and the designated liaison to the Pemkowet Police Department, it’s up to her to ensure relations between the mundane and eldritch communities run smoothly.

But when a young man from a nearby college drowns—and signs point to eldritch involvement—the town’s booming paranormal tourism trade is at stake. Teamed up with her childhood crush, Officer Cody Fairfax, a sexy werewolf on the down-low, Daisy must solve the crime—and keep a tight rein on the darker side of her nature. For if she’s ever tempted to invoke her demonic birthright, it could accidentally unleash nothing less than Armageddon.

Review:

So remember the very early days of the Anita Blake series where the focus was on crimes with preternatural angles with some slightly awkward flirting with Jean-Claude? The first nine-books or so, before the stories became dominated by which overly-endowed male would be joining her bed next and what new power she’d obtain from said coupling? Do you miss those early books?

Give Dark Currents a chance. Trust me on this.

As for the rest of us, if you’ve come from reading the Kushiel’s Legacy books the first thing you notice is that at first blush, the writing doesn’t sound much like Carey at all. The tone sounds like many an other urban fantasy title on the market: casual and slightly brisk and not at all like the lush, elegant and semi-formal prose of her other series. In fact, you would be forgiven for thinking they were written by two different women as they sound so different.

But then you keep reading and Carey’s gifts come through.

So often in Urban Fantasy have we seen concepts of some kind of boundary that separates Earth/the mortal realm from the forces of Heaven and Hell. Usually it’s giving a name like The Boundary or the Seal – something simple. Here? It’s the Inviolate Wall. Does it need to be the Inviolate Wall? Of course not. Is it a sign that perhaps there is more than the usual level of creativity in this book? Yep.

Brownies, Naga, Faeries, Ghouls, Vampires, Norn, Naiads – all sorts of creatures come into play here. I love the concept that there are these pockets of preternatural creatures living where the boundary is thin and the magic is accessible. The concept of Yggdrasil II and Hel as being a kind of ruler over everyone is awesome, and having Daisy being Hel’s representative on earth.

Speaking of Daisy, I’m totally digging her as our heroine. Her situation isn’t one that I can recall seeing before, and she’s blissfully attitude free. She’s got a nice mix of friends, her mom is interesting and heck, I’m even digging this weird attraction situation going on with a ghoul, which my brain tells me should probably be giving me the icks. Speaking of possible romantic interests, I do how Cody’s lycanthropy is depicted here. It’s definitely got more emphasis on the wolf and less “human who happens to go furry once a month” variety, which I dig.

In short, this book is the kind of urban fantasy I love: unique and detailed world with likable characters. It certainly doesn’t push boundaries like her epic fantasy does, but that’s okay. She’s not reinventing the wheel, but she’s putting a nice coat of polish on it.

I love discovering new series that I enjoy, and the fact that it’s close-ended trilogy is a huge bonus because it’s not a big commitment.

If you like Urban Fantasy, you owe yourself a look at this book.

Verdict: Buy It

Available: Now

Between – Megan Whitmer

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Summary:

When a supernatural freak of nature forces her family to separate, seventeen-year-old Charlie Page must turn to her frustrating (yet gorgeous) neighbor, Seth, to help reunite them. Seth whisks Charlie to Ellauria—a magical world filled with the creatures of myths and legends—and tells her of the Fellowship, the group charged with protecting mystical beings from human discovery. (All except Bigfoot: that attention whore is a total lost cause.) But when Charlie learns that she’s under the Fellowship’s protection herself, well, “stressed” is an understatement.


Ellauria should be the safest place for Charlie while the Fellowship works to find her family, but things in the mystical realm aren’t what they seem.

Magic is failing, creatures are dying, and the Fellowship insists Charlie holds the key to saving everyone. With her family still missing and the danger in Ellauria growing, Charlie doesn’t know who she can trust. She’s dealing with a power she never asked for, falling for a guy she can’t have, and being forced to choose between her destiny and her heart. And if she chooses wrong, she could destroy magic forever.

Charlie may be in over her head.

Review:

I won this in a giveaway sometime back in 2014. I honestly don’t even remember entering the giveaway, but either way, this showed up and I shelved with a shrug of indifference because I got the vibe that this was going to be some fairly generic YA, of which I’ve read plenty of. Fast forward a year. I’ve been on a reading tear this weekend. I’m pretty much caught up in ARCs and decided it might be nice to read some of the books that’ve been hanging around on my shelves. I was looking for something easy to read so figured now was as good time as any.

That first impression was dead on.

Charlie’s a 17 year-old girl whose life is ruined when she doesn’t get into a summer residency program, because despite being an OMG AMAZING artist, her art apparently would only be good enough to get her into a top visual art program with that program or whatever. But before she can dwell on it too long, a Mothman (no, I’m not making this up) attacks the house and she is whisked away to Ellauria (how do you pronounce that anyway? Why not just Alluria and be done with it?) where she she is the last Muralet. I won’t spoil what a Muralet is (other to say that it is a not-so-good name, really naming is a problem throughout this book) but know she is special and of course her mere existence puts everything else at risk Because.

Oh, and I suppose I should mention that there is a Fellowship (which based on the description makes me think the author doesn’t really know what a fellowship is, because the organization as described does not fit one). There is a bitchy female character who is bitchy because the horrible trope demands it, not because there is any valid reason for her to be that way. In the interest of full disclosure, the MC is also annoyingly stubborn and keeps putting herself into danger, but because she is the main character I suppose we must applaud her for giving the finger to The Man. Or something. The most interesting part of the book is when it’s become clear that the main character’s brother gets brainwashed at some point and I think I’d rather have read that story because it would have been much more interesting. As it stands we barely learn that it’s happened before good triumphs evil and all we are left with is the brother sulking and wishing that both he and his sister were dead. Nice.

This is generic fantasy at its best/worst. You’ve read it all before, and you’ve read much better versions of it. I suppose the best I can say is that it’s generally inoffensive and it’s a fast read.

That’s not saying much, is it?

Ultimately, this book reminds me of advice often given to contestants on cooking shows: if you’re going to make a basic/simple dish, the execution better be flawless. And here, it’s just average at best. You can pick this up on an e-reader for $4. Die-hard fans of the genre, it might be worth a look. The rest of us can better spend our money elsewhere.

Verdict: Skip It

Available Now

Kushiel’s Scion (Kushiel’s Avatar #4/Imrael’s Trilogy #1) – Jacqueline Carey

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Summary:

It is whispered that Kushiel’s lineage carries the ability to perceive the flaws in mortal souls, to administer an untender mercy. I sense its presence like a shadow on my soul…the memories of blood and branding and horror, and the legacy of cruelty that runs in my veins, shaping my own secret vow and wielding it like a brand against the darkness, whispering it to myself, over and over.
I will try to be good.

Imriel de la Courcel’s blood parents are history’s most reviled traitors, but his adoptive parents, the Comtesse Phedre and the warrior-priest Joscelin, are Terre d’Ange’s greatest champions. Stolen, tortured, and enslaved as a young boy, Imriel is now a Prince of the Blood, third in line for the throne in a land that revels in art, beauty, and desire. It is a court steeped in deeply laid conspiracies…and there are many who would see the young prince dead. Some despise him out of hatred for his birth mother Melisande, who nearly destroyed the realm in her quest for power. Others because they fear he has inherited his mother’s irresistible allure – and her dangerous gifts. And as he comes of age, plagued by dark yearnings, Imriel shares their fears.

At the royal court, where gossip is the chosen poison and assailants wield slander instead of swords, the young prince fights character assassins while struggling with his own innermost conflicts. But when Imriel departs to study at the fames University of Tiberium, the perils he faces turn infinitely more deadly.

Searching for wisdom, he finds instead a web of manipulation, where innocent words hide sinister meanings, and your lover of last night may become your hired killer before dawn. Now a simple act of friendship will leave Imriel trapped in a besieged city where the infamous Melisande is worshiped as a goddess; where a dead man leads an army; and where the prince must face his greatest test: to find his true self.

Review:

Kushiel’s Scion is the first book of Imrael’s trilogy, and the continuation of the Kushiel’s Legacy. While it is its own trilogy, like true epic fantasy, it draws on characters and events of the first three books: it will make much, much, much more sense for having read Phedre’s books and your enjoyment will go up accordingly.

That aside, there’s a question that all but hangs over the series: is it as good as Phedre’s tale?

In short: no.

And to be fair, it almost couldn’t be. Phedre is genuinely unique. I cannot think of anyone who comes close to comparing Phedre, there are many more out there like Imrael.

Does that make this less of a good book?

Not really.

It’s just different. The quiet start is expected: it lets Imrael grow up, and to try and deal with some of the demon’s of his past. Carey takes her time with it: if he never fully conquers them (which wouldn’t have been believable) he’s begun to heal from them, which is nice to see. Even when the action picks up, its of a different flavor – more political – and not as adventurous, I guess? This is more a character study, I think. It’s different, but still compelling. It’s hard to explain if you haven’t read both books. I will also say there is no antagonist as compelling as Melisandre, and her shadow still hangs over the books. It’s both good and bad, because another strong antagonist could have really helped this trilogy distinguish itself.

If I’m not as wildly enthusiastic about this book it’s because I think Phedre’s books were truly special. This wasn’t quite on the same level. It’s still a great book, and I’ll still get around to reading the next one, but I just don’t see this sticking with me in the same way, and I think there’s a reason that the first trilogy is the one that has had the most staying power. So yeah. A lesser version of an amazing book is still a great book and that is what this is.

Finally, I will contract my earlier statement and statement say that if you haven’t read the first set because you couldn’t get behind the erotica aspects, this may be worth picking up. There’s not nearly as much sex and it’s much more vanilla, so that is something to consider. Maybe it’ll even entice you into giving Phedre’s trilogy a chance. For the rest of us though,  you know if you’re into Carey, and if you are, you’ll enjoy this.

Verdict: Buy It

Available: Now