This Savage Song (Monsters of Verity #1) – Victoria Schwab

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Summary:

There’s no such thing as safe in a city at war, a city overrun with monsters. In this dark urban fantasy from acclaimed author Victoria Schwab, a young woman and a young man must choose whether to become heroes or villains—and friends or enemies—with the future of their home at stake. The first of two books, This Savage Song is a must-have for fans of Holly Black, Maggie Stiefvater, and Laini Taylor.

Kate Harker and August Flynn are the heirs to a divided city—a city where the violence has begun to breed actual monsters. All Kate wants is to be as ruthless as her father, who lets the monsters roam free and makes the humans pay for his protection. All August wants is to be human, as good-hearted as his own father, to play a bigger role in protecting the innocent—but he’s one of the monsters. One who can steal a soul with a simple strain of music. When the chance arises to keep an eye on Kate, who’s just been kicked out of her sixth boarding school and returned home, August jumps at it. But Kate discovers August’s secret, and after a failed assassination attempt the pair must flee for their lives. In This Savage Song, Victoria Schwab creates a gritty, seething metropolis, one worthy of being compared to Gotham and to the four versions of London in her critically acclaimed fantasy for adults, A Darker Shade of Magic. Her heroes will face monsters intent on destroying them from every side—including the monsters within.

Review:

I remember requesting a DRC on a whim, not actually expecting to get approval. I got approval the same day as The Crown’s Game. And while I was excited for both, and more or less read the former the day I got the green light, I just sat on this for a while until I picked it up again today. Skipping over what I thought was a problematic prologue and going for the first chapter resulted me getting absolutely hooked. I read 65% of it on my flight home and finished the rest in the same evening because I will be honest: this book is compulsively readable. It’s a great book for when you’re looking for something truly fun to sink your teeth into.

If it I enjoyed it so much why was the prologue a problem for me?

It all comes down to Kate. Kate is the human who would be a monster to impress her father. Her father rules his half of the city mostly by fear, and she wants to be wanted by him, to be allowed to go home again and the lengths of what she’s willing to do to get there turn her pretty dark, pretty quick. It’s sympathetic in that sense of you can tell it’s a girl who just wants her only remaining parent to love her, but it’s also cold enough and hard enough that it takes a long time to reach that sympathetic point. I’m not entirely convinced that that was the POV to start out with.

Luckily, the book has an intriguing premise set in an interesting world that blissfully isn’t telling another story of teenagers improbably banding together to overthrow the tyrant/save the day or what have you. Although the book does walk some familiar paths, the story doesn’t go exactly where you expect it to, and that’s also a refreshing bonus.

If anything, my only real complaint is I would have loved to see what Schwab could have done this under her V.E. Schwab pen-name. This book is pretty dark for YA, but the premise could have gone darker still without much trouble and I would have loved really exploring it. Scwhab never really fully explores the morality at play here and she proved in Vicious especially that it’s something that she’s fantastic at.

All told, this is a return to form for me (I’m not a fan of A Darker Shade of Magic) as it shows all the hallmark originality and questionable morality that makes her stand out as an author. If you haven’t preordered this yet,  why don’t you get on that, mmkay?

Verdict: Buy It

Available: July 5

Age of Myth (The Legends of the First Empire #1) – Michael Sullivan

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Summary:

What does it mean if the gods can be killed? The first novel in an epic new fantasy series for readers of Brent Weeks, Brandon Sanderson, Peter V. Brett, and Scott Lynch.

Michael J. Sullivan’s trailblazing career began with the breakout success of his Riyria series: full-bodied, spellbinding fantasy adventures whose imaginative scope and sympathetic characters won a devoted readership. Now, Sullivan’s stunning hardcover debut, Age of Myth, inaugurates an original five-book series, and one of fantasy’s finest next-generation storytellers continues to break new ground.

Since time immemorial, humans have worshipped the gods they call Fhrey, truly a race apart: invincible in battle, masters of magic, and seemingly immortal. But when a god falls to a human blade, the balance of power between men and those they thought were gods changes forever. Now, only a few stand between humankind and annihilation: Raithe, reluctant to embrace his destiny as the God Killer, Suri, a young seer burdened by signs of impending doom, and Persephone, who must overcome personal tragedy to lead her people. The Age of Myth is over; the time of rebellion has begun.

Review:

Something about this book just doesn’t quite sit well with me, and it left me uneasy as I read this entire piece. Finally, I decided it was this: the juxtaposition of the vaguely Bronze-age Rhune versus the pure high fantasy Fhrey is an uneasy one, and the egotism in which the Fhrey see the Rhune (aka the humans) a mere rodens that are incapable of thought makes the latter seem almost like cartoonish. I get it: racism often lends itself to superiority complexes, but this takes it to near extreme levels. It doesn’t help that some characters somehow can speak the Fhrey tongue, but when in speaking with the Fhrey, that language comes off as broken enough to make Ralph Wiggum seem smart. I get that they wouldn’t fully understand it, but in combination with how the Fhrey see the Rhune, it just adds that extra layer of discomfort.

On the other hand, if there is one thing I thought Sullivan did quite well was the portrayal of gender politics in the book. Persephone is constantly in danger throughout this book, and in large part it was because she is a smart woman who commanded respect – unlike the man who took over after her husband died. Those tensions played off quite believably and honestly, it is her struggle that made the book worth reading. Although the Art was quite an interesting magic system, the disconnect between the two stories was so jarring, and the antagonists so cliched that they just didn’t feel like they belonged in this book.

Finally, in an author’s note at the start of the book, Sullivan mentions this book is set 3000 years before the events of the Riyria Chronicles. And honestly, I have to wonder why he would even bring it up. Yes, there is very much a tangential connection that will eventually come into play with the First Empire, but right now the two worlds are so completely and utterly disconnected that there may as well be no connection. Furthermore, this world feels so different from the ones in the other books (even beyond the obvious advancement in time) that it’s hard to see how the worlds are even connected. It might be one of those things that takes the five full books to bring to light, but for now at least, it leaves you going “these are connected, really?”

All told, I’m a bit torn on it, but if you like traditional fantasy at all, you might still want to give it a look. While problematic, it is interesting and I found myself engaged as I was reading it in a way I haven’t been for a lot of books lately. For that alone, I’d say it’s worth a look.

Verdict: Borrow it

Available: June 28

 

 

Buy It (Now!) The Crown’s Game – Evelyn Skye

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Summary:

Vika Andreyeva can summon the snow and turn ash into gold. Nikolai Karimov can see through walls and conjure bridges out of thin air. They are enchanters—the only two in Russia—and with the Ottoman Empire and the Kazakhs threatening, the Tsar needs a powerful enchanter by his side.

And so he initiates the Crown’s Game, an ancient duel of magical skill—the greatest test an enchanter will ever know. The victor becomes the Imperial Enchanter and the Tsar’s most respected adviser. The defeated is sentenced to death.

Raised on tiny Ovchinin Island her whole life, Vika is eager for the chance to show off her talent in the grand capital of Saint Petersburg. But can she kill another enchanter—even when his magic calls to her like nothing else ever has?

For Nikolai, an orphan, the Crown’s Game is the chance of a lifetime. But his deadly opponent is a force to be reckoned with—beautiful, whip smart, imaginative—and he can’t stop thinking about her.

And when Pasha, Nikolai’s best friend and heir to the throne, also starts to fall for the mysterious enchantress, Nikolai must defeat the girl they both love . . . or be killed himself.

As long-buried secrets emerge, threatening the future of the empire, it becomes dangerously clear . . . the Crown’s Game is not one to lose.

Review:

I’m not going to beat around the bush: I loved this book. Loved. This is one of the rare books that was even better than the some of the hype implied.

First off, I loved all the characters major and minor. Everyone felt distinct and fleshed out, aside from one side character none of them felt cartoonish or over the top. I especially like the balance that Skye manages to achieve with Vika and Nikolai. Both of them want to want, both of them understand that success means the chance to live and that killing their competition is the best way to do that and so they really do try. At the same point in time, they have their humanity. They’re relieved when they fail. I think a lot of authors (especially YA authors) would have fallen into the trap of having one of them be like “I’m not going to play the Game! I’m not going to kill!” and she avoided that. I also liked how she acknowledged the political tensions of the time without turning it into a story where Vika joined the rebellion. She promised to serve the Tsar, and she will. It’s refreshing.

The magic was well done – evocative and enough of a framework to know the rules they are playing by, but not over-expained. It just comes off as exquisite and exquisitely done. I found myself looking forward to each Turn to see what they’d do next.

Finally, the pacing was spot on and the three main point of views all worked well making the book come together in a real elegant way.

My quibbles were few: there was a side-story with a character introduced late in the book that I don’t think ultimately added that much to the tale and I think she could have found another way to achieve the same end result. There was also a revelation at the end of the book straight out of the Book of YA Tropes that felt pointless. Really though, these were small and neither detracted anywhere near enough to consider not recommending this book.

This is a wonderful bit of fantasy that you should check out without second thought. Evelyn Skye is running a pre-order campaign that you can check out here if that’s your game. When I wrote this review, Amazon had it for $11.09, an absolute bargain, so go forth and pre-order!

Verdict: Buy It

Available: May 17th

 

Review: Black City Saint (Black City Saint #1) – Richard A. Knaack

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Summary:

For more than sixteen hundred years, Nick Medea has followed and guarded the Gate that keeps the mortal realm and that of Feirie separate, seeking in vain absolution for the fatal errors he made when he slew the dragon. All that while, he has tried and failed to keep the woman he loves from dying over and over.

Yet in the fifty years since the Night the Dragon Breathed over the city of Chicago, the Gate has not only remained fixed, but open to the trespasses of the Wyld, the darkest of the Feiriefolk. Not only does that mean an evil resurrected from Nick’s own past, but the reincarnation of his lost Cleolinda, a reincarnation destined once more to die.

Nick must turn inward to that which he distrusts the most: the Dragon, the beast he slew when he was still only Saint George. He must turn to the monster residing in him, now a part of him…but ever seeking escape.

The gang war brewing between Prohibition bootleggers may be the least of his concerns. If Nick cannot prevent an old evil from opening the way between realms…then not only might Chicago face a fate worse than the Great Fire, but so will the rest of the mortal realm

Review:

So in the last week I reviewed a historical fantasy set during Prohibition a YA fantasy (supposedly) about the Fey. So this time, I’d thought I’d mix things up and review a fantasy about the Fey set during Prohibition!

Man, I wish I could take credit for the timing on this, but funny how “to be read lists” just work out that way.

So anyway. Black City Saint is a book with interesting ideas and lackluster presentation. Nick Medea was once known as St. George (not really a spoiler since it’s more or less told you at the start of Chapter 2) – yes, the St. George that slew the dragon. It just so happens that the dragon was quite real and guarding the Gate that separates the Fae realm from our our own. So through a bit of magic, he’s now immortal and is tasked with making sure the Fae stay out – especially the particularly nasty Oberon – from trying to take things over which would eventually spell the end of mankind.

It’s a cool idea, but the execution left something to be desired. The book is written in a first person point of view but it sounds very stiff. While it does make sense for the book to be in this point of view, it comes off as if Knaack just isn’t comfortable with it and as a result, neither are the readers.

I should also mention that this is one of those books that’s mostly action, with Nick dashing from set piece to set piece. It was kind of nice seeing Chicago being used as more of a character, because the actual characters fell a little flat, all of them pretty much much having only one trait to them. Nick was devoted to his duties. He had some Feirie-realm helpers that seemed almost slavishly devoted to Nick. Detective Cortez was the One Straight Cop Amongst An Endless Sea of Corrupt Ones and the current reincarnation of Cleolinda was pretty much an annoying damsel-in-distress (I lost track of how many times she said  variations of”You’re not leaving me here!) for the majority of the book until she suddenly took a few levels in badass towards the very end.

All told, this book has some interesting ideas let down by some so-so presentation. If you like action oriented books and the concept intrigues you, you might want to give it a look. If you need emotional engagement to get into a book, keep looking.

Verdict: Borrow it

Available: March 1

Seven Black Diamonds – Melissa Marr

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Summary:

This riveting fantasy marks Melissa Marr’s return to the world of faery courts that made her Wicked Lovely series an international phenomenon.

Lilywhite Abernathy is a criminal—she’s half human, half fae, and since the time before she was born, a war has been raging between humans and faeries. The Queen of Blood and Rage, ruler of the fae courts, wants to avenge the tragic death of her heir due to the actions of reckless humans.

Lily’s father has always shielded her, but when she’s sent to the prestigious St. Columba’s school, she’s delivered straight into the arms of a fae sleeper cell—the Black Diamonds. The Diamonds are planted in the human world as the sons and daughters of the most influential families and tasked with destroying it from within. Against her will, Lilywhite’s been chosen to join them…and even the romantic attention of the fae rock singer Creed Morrison isn’t enough to keep Lily from wanting to run back to the familiar world she knows.

Melissa Marr returns to faery in a dramatic story of the precarious space between two worlds and the people who must thrive there. The combination of ethereal fae powers, tumultuous romance, and a bloodthirsty faery queen will have longtime fans and new readers at the edge of their seats.

Review:

You know. This isn’t a bad book. It’s a bland book.

The Queen of Blood and Rage is an Evil Queen because actions in the first chapter of the book tell us soon. The Black Diamonds are killers/terrorists against the humans because we are introduced to two of them in media res of a mission. Lilywhite is…well, that’s a spoiler but I imagine most people will figure out who Lilywhite is within a few chapters.

But really though? This book is all talk.

Talk. Talk. Talk. A few comments about “toxins” and how the humans have ruined the earth (for a world that is supposedly in some kind of post-Apocalypse you really can’t tell) and talk.

The Seven Black Diamonds never go on any missions together. Backstory is conveniently dumped upon us in the form of a letter and action towards the end of the book is pretty predictable for this sort of thing.

I also feel like there’s just not much character development. The biggest defining characteristic of any of them is that Lilywhite has these rules that she likes to chant that remind me of the Ferengi Rules of Acquisition only they seem more like mantras than anything a criminal family would actually live by (I don’t think criminal bosses would really think that choices matter). For that matter, I’m still not sure why she had to the daughter of a crime boss. She could have been a more general socialite and it wouldn’t have had much of a change on the story.

I don’t know. It’s better than most YA faery stuff I’ve read, but I would still recommend Thorn Jack over this in a heartbeat if age-level didn’t matter to you. Ultimately, this book was good enough to keep me going to the end, and I did read it in a day, but it’s the very definition of a forgettable tale.

Verdict: Skip It

Available: March 1

Sword and Verse (Sword and Verse #1) – Kathy McMillan

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Summary:

Raisa was only a child when she was kidnapped and enslaved in Qilara. Forced to serve in the palace of the King, she’s endured hunger, abuse, and the harrowing fear of discovery. Everyone knows that Raisa is Arnath, but not that she is a Learned One, a part of an Arnath group educated in higher order symbols. In Qilara, this language is so fiercely protected that only the King, the Prince, and Tutors are allowed to know it. So when the current Tutor-in-training is executed for sharing the guarded language with slaves and Raisa is chosen to replace her, Raisa knows that, although she may have a privileged position among slaves, any slipup could mean death.

That would be challenging enough, but training alongside Prince Mati could be her real undoing. And when a romance blossoms between them, she’s suddenly filled with a dangerous hope for something she never before thought possible: more. Then she’s approached by the Resistance—an underground army of slaves—to help liberate the Arnath people. Joining the Resistance could mean freeing her people…but she’d also be aiding in the war against her beloved, an honorable man she knows wants to help the slaves.

Working against the one she loves—and a palace full of deadly political renegades—has some heady consequences. As Raisa struggles with what’s right, she unwittingly uncovers a secret that the Qilarites have long since buried…one that, unlocked, could bring the current world order to its knees.

And Raisa is the one holding the key.

Review:

So have you read the book about the slave girl in the palace convinced to use her position to help out a rebellion?

Oh. You have?

But wait! She’s having an affair with/is in love with the Prince! And the Prince really wants to abolish slavery but his father doesn’t agree!

That too?

Yeah. You’ve probably read some variation of this book before, but I will say that this is a pretty good example of the genre. I don’t really have much to say about this book other than the sudden and huge occurrence of magic towards the very end feels very out of nowhere(not to mention a wee bit messianic) and the ending is painfully corny with a hint of kumbaya going on, though not out of place for the genre.

All told, if you like this kind of book, you’ll probably enjoy this book. There’s just not much more to be said.

Verdict: Borrow It

Available: Now

DNF – Kingfisher – Patricia McKillip

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Summary:

The Rogue Retrieval

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Summary:

Sleight of hand…in another land.

Stage magician Quinn Bradley has one dream: to headline his own show on the Vegas Strip. And with talent scouts in the audience wowed by his latest performance, he knows he’s about to make the big-time. What he doesn’t expect is an offer to go on a quest to a place where magic is all too real.

That’s how he finds himself in Alissia, a world connected to ours by a secret portal owned by a powerful corporation. He’s after an employee who has gone rogue, and that’s the least of his problems. Alissia has true magicians…and the penalty for impersonating one is death. In a world where even a twelve-year-old could beat Quinn in a swordfight, it’s only a matter of time until the tricks up his sleeves run out.

Scientist and blogger Dan Koboldt weaves wonder, humor, and heart into his debut novel, The Rogue Retrieval. Fans of Terry Brooks and Terry Pratchett will find this a thrilling read.

Review:

You know, I think might be the favorite book that I’ve read from the Harper Voyager Impulse line. When I was trying to think of negatives about this book, about the worst thing I could thing of was “it doesn’t exactly break any new ground,” but that isn’t necessarily even a bad thing, if done well.

And honestly, it was.

The book knew exactly what it was: a story of contemporary, tech-forward humans traveling to a world that’s medieval in its technology to try and retrieve one of their own that went to this world and decided to not come back. And what’s impressive is that while you can figure out where the story is going in terms of their assignment, the story as a whole doesn’t go where you’d expect it to at all. It was a pleasant surprise. When you combine it with the likable characters, it makes for a fun, if basic read with an intriguing set-up for a possible sequel. All told, if you like the set up, pick this up. At $2.99, you can’t go wrong giving it a chance.

Verdict: Buy It

Available: January 19

Review: The Cold Between (Central Corps #1) – Elizabeth Bonesteel

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Summary:

Deep in the stars, a young officer and her lover are plunged into a murder mystery and a deadly conspiracy in this first entry in a stellar military science-fiction series in the tradition of Lois McMaster Bujold.

When her crewmate, Danny, is murdered on the colony of Volhynia, Central Corps chief engineer, Commander Elena Shaw, is shocked to learn the main suspect is her lover, Treiko Zajec. She knows Trey is innocent—he was with her when Danny was killed. So who is the real killer and why are the cops framing an innocent man?

Retracing Danny’s last hours, they discover that his death may be tied to a mystery from the past: the explosion of a Central Corps starship at a wormhole near Volhynia. For twenty-five years, the Central Gov has been lying about the tragedy, even willing to go to war with the outlaw PSI to protect their secrets.

With the authorities closing in, Elena and Trey head to the wormhole, certain they’ll find answers on the other side. But the truth that awaits them is far more terrifying than they ever imagined . . . a conspiracy deep within Central Gov that threatens all of human civilization throughout the inhabited reaches of the galaxy—and beyond.

Review:

Oh The Cold Between, how much I wanted to love you. You’re a military sci-fi novel written by a woman that contains several strong and likable female characters: there just aren’t enough of you out on the shelves these days. So I stuck with you. I kept going and kept going just waiting for that moment when it would all click together for me and somehow it never quite happened, which is just so disappointing.

Trying to peg the why of it, however, has been difficult.

Pacing may be an issue: the book touts the mystery surrounding the tragedy that happened twenty-five years ago; and yet we don’t really learn what happened until 80% of the way in. So we have an extremely slow build-up, which then forces a quick resolution that ultimately feels anti-climatic because it all happens so fast. The revelation surrounding the mystery doesn’t really aid things either: it’s not exactly obvious, but it doesn’t feel as revelatory as it should either especially since it’s a conspiracy 25 years in the making.

The antagonists may be another issue: there are two, and both feel one note. One is a sadist who goes fully as far as threatening to rape our protagonist – both while she’s alive, and promising to continue to do so after she’s died. The other is power hungry, or maybe power mad, and he seemingly has no other speed so he’s either angry that he’s getting shut down, or probably abusing the power that he does have. Nuance would have gone a long way for both characters here. I know that Bonesteel was trying to make a point about corruption and unchecked power, but those kind of messages tend to get muddled when the bad guys are so flat.

Finally, I’m not sure that I quite bought into the relationship between Elena and Trey. While I appreciate her sense of justice in not wanting to leave him behind, Bonesteel wrote them as if they’d been together or known each other for quite some time – at one point Trey even tells another character something to the effect that he doesn’t know Elena at all. But you know what, neither does Trey. They had a one night stand. Even by the time you factor in the time spent in space and running and what not, they’ve known each other for what, a week? Maybe two absolute tops? He doesn’t know her that well either, and so when he’s telling her he loves her, it’s kind of suspect. The book does focus a lot on that relationship (and relationships in general), so if it doesn’t work for you, it hurts the book as a whole.

So yeah. Like I said. I wanted to love this book and I just couldn’t and that’s just such a shame.

Verdict: A weak Borrow it – There is some good stuff here, and I think that if you like the relationship aspects more than I did, you’ll get some good enjoyment out of it.

Available: March 8

Stacking the Shelves #14

So that whole “I better slow down” thing I posted about in my last Stacking the Shelves post. Yeah. That didn’t work out terribly well. Funny how that happens when you’re a bookworm, but especially when you’re a blogger. I’m adding another 13 books to the 21 books of last month and yikes. My TBR pile is ballooning again! #firstworldproblems (of the best kind at that). At least I’ll be able to cross one book off my list shortly? That’s progress, right? 🙂

DRC provided by the publisher

There’s all kinds stuff in here, and that mix is what has me so excited. The Rogue Retrieval is contemporary urban fantasy. I decided to give contemporary YA another chance with You Were Here. Arena is dystopian sci-fi that takes professional gaming to extremes.  Magruder’s Curiosity Cabinet is a historical mystery, while Last Call at Nightshade Lounge is NA Fantasy – a new sub-genre for the new genre as a whole, while Kingfisher and In the Shadow of Gods are the closest things to “traditional” fantasy on this list. It’s a nice mix to keep things fresh!

Kindle book purchased by me

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A dark, western fantasy. My last experience with this sub-genre was so-so, but the story sounded intriguing, it was recommended by a blog I trust and it was only $1.99! How could I not?

Physical book purchased by me

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I said I meant to finish this series, and I meant it! I decided to pick up the UK paperback version, as it was about the same price as the Kindle version! Finishing the series is bittersweet. I liked what I’ve been reading, but I’m definitely burnt out on the author as a whole and I hope that doesn’t impact how I feel about this book when I do get to it.

Physical books received as gifts

All of these were gifts from my #otspsecretsister in my last box. She asked me what series I’d like to read, and this is what I asked for. I don’t think I actually expected to get all of them though, which is so cool! And the Brick Shakespeare looks like a fun book to flip through. I’m a LEGO fan, so this was a fun and thoughtful gift 🙂

And that’s it for now! Now let’s see if I can make a dent in this pile! What about you? Anything new on your shelves?