The Lost Sun (Gods of New Asgard #1) – Tessa Gratton

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Summary:

Fans of Neil Gaiman’s “American Gods” and Holly Black’s “The Curse Workers” will embrace this richly drawn, Norse-mythology-infused alternate world: the United States of Asgard. Seventeen-year-old Soren Bearskin is trying to escape the past. His father, a famed warrior, lost himself to the battle-frenzy and killed thirteen innocent people. Soren cannot deny that berserking is in his blood–the fevers, insomnia, and occasional feelings of uncontrollable rage haunt him. So he tries to remain calm and detached from everyone at Sanctus Sigurd’s Academy. But that’s hard to do when a popular, beautiful girl like Astrid Glyn tells Soren she dreams of him. That’s not all Astrid dreams of–the daughter of a renowned prophetess, Astrid is coming into her own inherited abilities.


When Baldur, son of Odin and one of the most popular gods in the country, goes missing, Astrid sees where he is and convinces Soren to join her on a road trip that will take them to find not only a lost god, but also who they are beyond the legacy of their parents and everything they’ve been told they have to be.

Review:

At the same time I was devouring this book, I’ve been working on my Best of 2015 post. And though I’ve had most of my list for quite some time, the bottom few books were giving me trouble. While I managed to sort out most of it, I had one spot remaining where I was never quite happy with the YA fantasy title I had been putting in there. It just didn’t feel right. But then I read this book and suddenly the solution to my dilemma seems clear. Perhaps it was fated, handy, for a book about fate.

The Lost Sun is a book about fate. It is a book about embracing who you are, what your destiny is, and that the path we take to get there is never quite as we might expect it to be. While some consider the notion of Fate to be somehow unkind as it seems in theory to be inherently opposed to the idea of Free Will, this book does not take that path. If anything, this book shows us how we meet our Fate because of the choices that we are forced to make. Nothing that ultimately occurs in this novel unfairly thrust upon them. The choices – aid Astrid or do not. Aid Baldur or do not. Embrace being a Berserker or ask Odin to relieve him of this burden – are laid about before our characters, and it is through our characters choices that the future that Astrid sees comes into being. And as a reader, you eagerly follow as our hero Soren makes his decisions. It has been quite some time since I so eagerly devoured a book, longing for a moment to steal so I could read more. And that we can thank the excellent job Gratton did in developing her protagonists.

All of the main characters in this book are well developed and distinct. Soren fights what he is because he fears winding up like his father, and yet his courage and devotion to his friends remains ever true. Astrid is devout in her belief and yet her budding love for Soren is no less strong. Vidir is wild and lively, a good foil to them both.

Rounding out the good characters are the world she places them in. Familiar and unique all at once, it posits the idea of a United States that grew from the descendants of the Vikings who landed in North America centuries before the Europeans and where the Old Ways never quite died, and yet is fully modern with everything from televisions, the internet and fast food.

The author has recently re-released the books and with a newbie friendly $5 price tag, if you YA fantasy or are a fan of Norse Mythology, you owe yourself to check this series out. I know I’ve already bought the next book.

Verdict: Buy It

Available: Now

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