Chosen (Alex Verus #4) – Benedict Jacka

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Summary:

I don’t publicly advertise that I’m a mage, but I don’t exactly hide it either, and one of the odd things I’ve learnt over the years is just how much you can get away with if you’re blatant enough. Hide something behind smoke and mirrors and make people work to find it, and they’ll tear the place down looking for what’s there.

Alex Verus is a diviner who can see probable futures—a talent that’s gotten him out of many a tough scrape. But this time, he may be in over his head. Alex was once apprenticed to a Dark mage, and in his service he did a lot of things he isn’t proud of.

As rumors swirl that his old master is coming back, Alex comes face to face with his misdeeds in the form of a young adept whose only goal is to get revenge. Alex has changed his life for the better, but he’s afraid of what his friends—including his apprentice, Luna—will think of his past. But if they’re going to put themselves at risk, they need to know exactly what kind of man they’re fighting for…

Review:

Have you ever had one of those moments where you weren’t sure if you were liking something, and then all of the sudden realized you were looking at it wrong and then just got it?

I had one of those moments while reading Chosen the fourth book in the Alex Verus’ series.

See, here’s the thing: said adept from the summary? He’s just not interesting. He’s entire characterization is basically:

giphy

Only it was a sister who died and the adept manages to recruit a bunch of other kids into a kind of vigilante army that fights the dark mages nominally because the system’s broke, but in actuality just because he wants revenge.

And it makes for a very dull opponent and I was wondering when the book was going to get to it.

But then I realized, it’s also kind of not the point.

Chosen is really all about Alex and his backstory. What he did as an apprentice, and what he is now, and trying to reconcile the past with his present and the fact that you can’t always just make the bad stuff in your past disappear by not thinking about it.

One aspect of this series that I’ve always loved is that Jacka has very purposefully made Verus not a fighter. He’s not a battle mage, knows he’s not a battle mage and tries to avoid a fight whenever possible. It’s not that he’s a coward, it’s just the odds are perpetually against him, here so more than ever because of the numbers in this game. At his core, Alex is a decent guy and understandably doesn’t want to risk his friends, yet also knows he can’t just keep running. So he comes up with a plan that is brutal and effective. And what makes him so interesting as a character is that at the end of it all, he doesn’t regret the decision he makes, he regrets that he was forced to make that decision in the first place, forced to dig up that past he was so desperately trying to move beyond. It’s the kind of decision that really does put him squarely into anti-hero category without him necessarily being just an asshole for the sake of being an asshole. And that character study – the decisions he makes in this book – are what makes this book worth reading. There is plenty of action who like that kind of thing, though I found it a bit repetitive (get found, fight, run, repeat) after a while.

Alex Verus remains such an interesting character because at his core he is a decent guy who made some very poor decisions as a kid, and though he has been trying to overcome them, the fact remains that he doesn’t think like a good guy. He spent too much time with the Dark Mages as a vulnerable teenager and that training did leave a mark on him and that means that he’s willing to cross a line that most urban fantasy protagonists would never be allowed to cross.

Without question this is a series that quickly grew on me and is probably becoming one of my favorite of all time favorites. I look forward to reading Hidden and strongly recommend checking out the series if you haven’t already.

Verdict: Buy It

Available: Now

 

 

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