Thorn Jack (Night & Nothing #1) – Katherine Harbour

18505811

Summary:

They call us things with teeth. These words from Lily Rose Sullivan the night of her death haunts her seventeen-year-old sister, Finn, who has moved with her widowed father to his hometown of Fair Hollow, New York. After befriending a boy named Christie Hart and his best friend, Sylvie Whitethorn, Finn is invited to a lakeside party where she encounters the alluring Jack Fata, a member of the town’s mysterious Fata family. Despite Jack’s air of danger and his clever words, Finn learns they have things in common.

One day, while unpacking, Finn finds her sister’s journal, scrawled with descriptions of creatures that bear a sinister resemblance to Jack’s family. Finn dismisses these stories as fiction, but Jack’s family has a secret—the Fatas are the children of nothing and night, nomadic beings who have been preying on humanity for centuries—and Jack fears that his friendship with Finn has drawn the attention of the most dangerous members of his family—Reiko Fata and vicious Caliban, otherwise known as the white snake and the crooked dog.

Plagued with nightmares about her sister, Finn attempts to discover what happened to Lily Rose and begins to suspect that the Fatas are somehow tied to Lily Rose’s untimely death. Drawn to Jack, determined to solve the mystery of her sister’s suicide, Finn must navigate a dangerous world where nothing is as it seems.

Review:

Before I get this review going, have some music to go with it: it’s from a feature-length anime called Le Portrait de Petit Cossette, which had a lovely gothic atmosphere running throughout, much like this book.

Thorn Jack is dark fantasy telling the story of Finn and how she’s slowly brought into the world of the Fata’s and her attempts to get back out – life and sanity intact. One of the things that Harbour does really well is that you never feel safe in this world. Never once do you ever really buy that Jack is a viable candidate for a boyfriend. We’re not talking about someone like Edward or Angel where they make token protests about not being good for you, but never fully push away their girlfriends either – Jack consistently tries to pull himself away knowing that it isn’t good for either one of them.

His so-called family, the Fatas, is this constant menacing threat. Beautiful, ethereal and deadly, there is every sense that humans are their playthings and nothing more.  These are definitely not the Tinker Bell type of faery.

The prose in this novel is absolutely lovely, and really helps capture that dreamy feel. I have seen some complain about conversations that don’t seem to take logical turns, and I think that’s unfair. Those conversations are deliberately awkward as characters try to avoid conversations they rather not have. There’s also quite a bit of quoted poetry here and it doesn’t feel pretentious, it just fits in well even though it should feel out of place.

Finally, this series is interesting because the series description on Good Reads calls it young adult – but I (and Barnes and Nobles) heartily disagree. That’s not something you see often.

If you like dark fantasy, if you like gothic fantasy, pick this one up. Now that I’ve read it, I absolutely plan to go back and not only make a second go of the second book (which I had to put down because I was simply too lost without having read this one) and quite possibly the third one coming out in 2016. It’s simply lovely.

Verdict: Buy It

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One thought on “Thorn Jack (Night & Nothing #1) – Katherine Harbour

  1. Pingback: Top 10 of 2015 | Fantasy Findings

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