ARC: Uriel’s Fall (Ubiquity #1) – Loralie Hall

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eARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for review

Summary:

What’s a corporate demon to do when the voice in her head is devouring her sanity from the inside out, and the hosts of heaven and hell would rather see her destroyed than surrender a power they shouldn’t possess?

Ronnie has the job any entry-level angel or demon would sell their soul for—she’s a retrieval analyst for the largest search engine in the world. Ubiquity is a joint initiative between heaven and hell. Because what better way to track all of humanity’s secrets, both good and bad, than direct access to their web browsing habits.

She might appreciate the position a little more if a) she could remember anything about her life before she started working at Ubiquity, b) the damn voice in her head would just shut up already, and c) her boss wasn’t a complete dickhead.

As she searches for the solutions to the first two issues, and hopes the third will work itself out in performance reviews, she uncovers more petty backstabbing than an episode of Real Housewives, and a conspiracy as old as Lucifer’s descent from heaven. On top of all that, if she forgets the cover sheet on her TPS report one more time, she’s absolutely going on final written warning.

Now Ronnie’s struggling to keep her sanity and job, and stop the voice in her head from stealing her life. She almost misses the boredom of data analysis at Ubiquity. Almost.

Review:

I’m not sure how I managed to read two books back-to-back about female protagonists having unwanted hitch-hikers in their pysche, but somehow I have.

What I am sure of: this is how you do that concept right.

Without spoiling the story, I will just say that the explanation for how it all works is both simple, and makes sense. It’s a definite case of less is more, but remains satisfying to read. I’d almost suggest that Madison read this book, to get an idea of a better way of pursuing the concept.

This book is also superior in another, critical way: I like both our protagonist and her hitch-hiker. They have their own voices, their own personalities and they’re both likable. Critically, too, I think, is that Hall worked the hitch-hiker’s story has a purpose, it’s ties into the greater story of the world. It feels more thought out and it feels complete. And most important, it’s interesting!

As for the world, it’s a story of angels and demons. The mythology is, for the most part fairly traditional, but that’s okay. It’s gave Hall the platform she needed to tell the story she wanted to tell, which was ultimately Uriel’s story and Uriel’s story was interesting. Plus there were some nice bits of chemistry going on and a nice little steamy sex scene to boot.

Overall, this was a really clever, really fun urban paranormal fantasy. If you like the concept or the genre, you should enjoy yourself here.

Verdict: Buy It

Available: Now

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