ARC Review – Under My Skin (Immortality Strain #1) by Shawntell Madison

23382840eARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for fair review

Summary:

Everyone wants to either be a member of the Guild or work for them. Little does the populace know that the Guild hides sinister secrets…

For Tate Sullivan, life in her small, coastal town is far from glamorous. The affluent lives of the Guild members and their servants isn’t something she has ever wanted. But all sixteen year-olds must take a simple test, and Tate’s result thrusts her into the Guild’s world, one where they hide horrible plans for those they select. Tate must fight the relentless General Dagon for control of her mind, body, and soul to keep the one precious thing she has always taken for granted: herself.

Her only ally is the same handsome boy she is pitted against in General Dagon’s deadly game. Quinn desires nothing more than to end the life of General Dagon who has taken over Tate’s mind. While romance blooms between Tate and Quinn, General Dagon plots to eventually take over Tate’s body, and love might end before it even begins.

Review:

Oh book, I wanted to like you. You easily have the most interesting idea I’ve seen for a YA dystopian in ages, and for a self-published title, you are polished to a T and proof that self-published titles can easily sit side-by-side with books from the big publishers.

On the other hand, you squander your idea by completely and utterly under-developing it. This book raises so many questions: if everyone wants to at least work for the Guild, then shouldn’t it be common knowledge that your family gets a stipend if you get chosen? Whatever happened to the people we met at the facility who got chosen, but who weren’t bid upon? Did they get to put to work as janitors or were they killed? The Guild’s secret to immortality is body hopping in vessels like Tates, but it seems like Tate was wearing out pretty damn fast. If a body only lasted a year or two at most before they had to jump again, what kind of system is that? And if bodies last longer than that, why wasn’t it made clear that she was an exception, not a rule? I get that it’s set-up for future books, but it’s kind of important for understanding how this whole thing works. Speaking of body jumping, wouldn’t people notice? Like how did no one question that General Dagon suddenly has a daughter named Elsie or is the conspiracy so vast that the common person just doesn’t even know that it’s going on? How does Tate protect herself so damn well when the other vessels fell so quick? She have partial immunity to the virus or is it just because the plot demands? How does getting shocked by a machine once suddenly let you be able to “feel” who would make a good host? If Dagon is so good at controlling bodies he’s taken over, shouldn’t they have assumed that he was letting her do whatever she wanted? Why is there a Resistance any way? They seem to serve little purpose in this world other than to help explain things to Tate, we certainly see no other impact on the world at large.

You see how this is problematic.

Aside from the sense that all of this happening because the author wants it to happen this way, there isn’t much else to talk about. Tate is your generic YA heroine: loves her parents, loves her cousin, intelligent and plucky, determined to stand up to The Man. Her relationship to Quinn is less love and more Stockholm Syndrome. There’s nothing between them that can ever be constituted as romance; it’s all business between them. It’s difficult to shake the feeling that any emotions she develops for him are out of the fact that a) he’s handsome b) not a creep and c) the only guy even close to her age in the compound.

Overall, I feel like there’s promise here, but the premise just proved too elusive for the author to wrap her head around in a way that doesn’t eventually make you start questioning it – and considering this is only the first book in a series, you have to have a more solid foundation to work on.

This was a fun book, until things completely fell apart for me, and ultimately my enjoyment of much of book wasn’t enough to overcome the rather series problems with it later on.

Verdict: Skip it

Available: Today.

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