Review: The Midnight Queen – Sylvia Izzo Hunter

20821047ebook purchased by me

Summary:

In the hallowed halls of Oxford’s Merlin College, the most talented—and highest born—sons of the Kingdom of Britain are taught the intricacies of magickal theory. But what dazzles can also destroy, as Gray Marshall is about to discover…

Gray’s deep talent for magick has won him a place at Merlin College. But when he accompanies four fellow students on a mysterious midnight errand that ends in disaster and death, he is sent away in disgrace—and without a trace of his power. He must spend the summer under the watchful eye of his domineering professor, Appius Callender, working in the gardens of Callender’s country estate and hoping to recover his abilities. And it is there, toiling away on a summer afternoon, that he meets the professor’s daughter.

Even though she has no talent of her own, Sophie Callender longs to be educated in the lore of magick. Her father has kept her isolated at the estate and forbidden her interest; everyone knows that teaching arcane magickal theory to women is the height of impropriety. But against her father’s wishes, Sophie has studied his ancient volumes on the subject. And in the tall, stammering, yet oddly charming Gray, she finally finds someone who encourages her interest and awakens new ideas and feelings.

Sophie and Gray’s meeting touches off a series of events that begins to unravel secrets about each of them. And after the king’s closest advisor pays the professor a closed-door visit, they begin to wonder if what Gray witnessed in Oxford might be even more sinister than it seemed. They are determined to find out, no matter the cost…

Review:

There are light reads, and then there are light-weight reads. Light reads are your beach books. They are the kind of breezy books that, by their nature, aren’t really meant to hold any deeper meaning. They’re just meant to be fun and entertain you.

Then there are light-weight reads. Books that are meant to be more, but somehow don’t quite get there. I feel like The Midnight Queen is one of those books. It is meant to be a blending of magic and spycraft. There is magic and there is some spycraft, but they just don’t seem to amount to much, even though one gets the sense it was meant to add up to more.

This book takes place in kind of an alternate-history England, where magic has flourished. Izzo Hunter didn’t take much advantage of this though, and there’s no sense that things have changed much beyond the monarchs in power. Heck, we even still have a Henry the VIII, only now renamed Henry the Great. It’s the kind of reinventing that makes you wonder why the author bothered with the rebranding in the first place, though I suppose one could argue it’s because the Old Gods are still in favor, but eh. As for the magic, it’s a fairly typical system based on Latin spells and chants out of a book. You’ve seen it before. Ultimately, some thought did go into this world and its magic, but it’s still forgettable.

What about the espionage then? This is a book about Gray stumbling upon a plot against the King. Well…he stumbled upon it. And the other evidence. And that’s kind of it. There’s some work done with translating codices, but it’s the kind of plot that was entirely too dependent on luck and timing to fully believe. The evidence they gather is also kind of skimpy at best. You have no doubt that our protagonists believe themselves, but it’d be hard to convict based on what they provided. Fortunately for Gray and Sophie, there are plot-convenient priests of Apollo whose abilities to pull truths form prisoners also happens to serve as a convenient plot device that explains the scheme in full. Were it not for their existence, I feel like this novel might have ended <i>very</i> differently, with our heroes in jail for treason at best.

There is a plot twist regarding Sophie, but it’s kind of there. And convenient for our story.

As for Gray and Sophie, they were both likable and they made a cute couple, but that’s not really enough. Maybe if the romance aspect had been amped up then you could call this a romance and the other sins could be forgiven, but this isn’t being marketed as a romance, and given the couple don’t get together til the last quarter of the novel you can’t sell it as such.

I didn’t mind the time I spent reading this, but I have to say, the second you start thinking about it, the second it begins to leave you feeling a bit underwhelmed.

It’s a competent book and I think there are those who will definitely enjoy it, but as far as fantasy goes, there’s just so much good stuff out there right now that it makes it difficult to recommend this.

Verdict: Skip It

Available: Now

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